‘NYT’ report on stalled Iran deal talks hides Israel’s ongoing sabotage effort

  

It could have been written by Israel’s propaganda apparatus.

The Times whitewashes Israel’s efforts to sabotage the agreement, including by sponsoring murderous attacks inside Iran.

The paper quotes two “experts” without disclosing their pro-Israel bias, while ignoring others who could have told its readers the truth.

Additional slants further distort what is actually happening.

The danger here is far greater than misinformed Times readers.

For years, Israel has been trying to lure the U.S. into attacking Iran, supposedly to damage its nuclear program, a dangerous provocation that sober military experts, including Israelis, say would be ineffective but could lead to another war in the Mideast.

The word “Israel” appears only once in today’s 33-paragraph Times report, and then only in passing.

There’s zero mention of the most recent assassination of an Iranian official inside the country, last month.

Israel is suspected of long carrying out or sponsoring a campaign of sabotage, including the November 2020 killing of Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, the head of Iran’s atomic energy program. 

Here’s a friendly suggestion to the U.S. State Department: If you are in the middle of delicate negotiations with an adversary, it’s probably not a good idea to allow your ally to murder their citizens and to sabotage their economy.

In today’s article, the Times’s selection of outside experts to quote is comical.

First, Mark Dubowitz, who heads the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, which the paper identifies merely as “a think tank that takes a hard line against Iran’s government.”

In fact, the FDD is a front for Israel. By citing it, the Times promotes Israel’s views, while keeping the actual connection hidden. The paper gave Dubowitz a couple of paragraphs to opine.

The paper also handed 3 paragraphs to Dennis Ross, “a Middle East negotiator who has worked for several presidents.”

Veteran Mideast watchers will laugh out loud.

Ross is widely known as the most pro-Israel of all the professional peace processors, and is sometimes called “Israel’s lawyer,” even though he was supposedly employed by the United States.

Meanwhile, there’s no shortage of genuine experts with alternative views about the Iran deal negotiations, including distinguished Iranian-Americans like Trita Parsi and Sina Toossi.

They aren’t hiding, but somehow the Times reporters couldn’t find their phone numbers. (The website for the organization Responsible Statecraft regularly includes valuable comment from them and others.)

There’s more distortion.

The Times does blame Donald Trump for withdrawing from the nuclear deal, but then adds, “After Mr. Trump quit the deal and reimposed sanctions, Iran began violating its terms.”

The words “after” and “began” are doing a lot of extra work there.

Trump pulled the U.S. out in May 2018. Iran continued observing the agreement’s provisions for more than another year, until July 2019.

Then it waited another year, until May 2020, to start enriching uranium beyond what the deal permitted. 

Again, more is at stake here than merely a misled New York Times readership.

Powerful elements within Israel, a country that is ostensibly America’s ally, are trying to trick us into conflict with Iran, a fight that is in no way in our national interest. 

If it breaks out, readers of the most influential newspaper in the country will have no idea why.

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